MISSISSIPPI MINUTE MEN

(STATE TROOPS)

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1st (King’s) Regiment Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

2nd (Quinn’s) Regiment Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

3rd (Owens’) Regiment Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

4th (Bromley’s) Regiment Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

5th (Robinson’s) Regiment Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

1st (Harper’s) Battalion Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

2nd (Cook’s) Battalion Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

3rd (Burgin’s) Battalion Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

4th (Postlethwait’s) Battalion Mississippi Infantry Minute Men

1st (Blythe’s) Battalion Mississippi Cavalry Minute Men

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(from Dunbar Rowland’s "Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898";

company listings courtesy of H. Grady Howell’s "For Dixie Land,

I’ll Take My Stand")

The Minute Men were organized under the order of Maj.-Gen. T. C. Tupper, commanding State troops. dated May, 1862, in accordance with which the Colonels of Militia in each county made up the companies required of them severally from the militia companies. The term of enlistment was six months. The troops were not mustered into the Confederate States service, bit were subject to the orders of Confederate officers. According to the report of Adjutant-General Jones S. Hamilton, bearing date November 1, 1863, but apparently of earlier date in fact, "there were at first seventy companies of infantry and thirteen companies of cavalry, from which there were organized five regiments and four battalions of infantry and one battalion of cavalry. The remaining cavalry companies were unattached and operated in the northern and northwestern part of the State. The cavalry battalion is now filled to a regiment and the unattached companies have entered other cavalry organizations since formed. Most of the infantry served out their term of enlistment in that arm of the service, but cavalry being greatly needed in April last, many were permitted to change their service, upon condition that they were to re-volunteer for twelve months. By this means nearly two regiments were formed of men whose term of enlistment had nearly expired."

 

The organization of Minute Men then were:

First Regiment. Lientenant-Colonel Lawhorn, disbanded.

Second Regiment, Colonel Quin, now being reorganized.

Third Regiment, Col. W. J. Owens, disbanded.

Fourth Regiment, Col. W. Bromley, disbanded.

Fifth Regiment, Col. H. C. Robinson. Vicksburg.

First Battalion, Major Harper, disbanded.

Second Battalion, Major Cook, disbanded.

Third Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Burgin, Vicksburg.

Fourth Battalion, Major Fairley, being reorganized.

First Battalion Cavalry, Major G. L. Blythe.

 

As a result of the reorganization mentioned by the Adjutant-General the following commands were formed:

First Regiment Cavalry, Colonel Blythe.

Second Regiment Cavalry, Colonel Smith.

Third Regiment Cavalry, Colonel McGuirk.

Ham's Battalion Cavalry.

Davenport's Battalion Cavalry.

Perrin's Battalion Cavalry.

 

There were also unattached companies in North Mississippi, in the fall of 1863, being organized into a regiment by General George.

Charles E. Smedes was Brigadier-General commanding Third Brigade, Camp Tupper, at Bolton, August, 1862.

Reuben Davis commanded one brigade.

In September, 1863, Gen S. D. Lee listed the following as State troops of mounted men organized under the call of General Johnston for defense of the State during the Vicksburg campaign, armed and provisioned and paid by the Confederate States but not enlisted in the Confederate States Provisional Army:

 

First Regiment, reorganized under Brigadier-General George.

Second Regiment--Lieutenant-Colonel Lowry.

Third Regiment, Colonel McGuirk.

Ham's Battalion.

Davenport's Battalion.

Companies of Captains Weatherell, Perry, Herden, Hartin, Red, Hall, Saunders, Brookten.

 

These included same companies that had been organized under the act of Congress authorizing Partisan Rangers, and had been in service from 1862. They were accustomed to meeting raiding parties, defending the country and attending to their crops in times of quiet. They were disposed to give little heed to demands for organization.

Brigadier-General George, of the State troops, began the work of reorganizing the independent commands in the north part of the State after Colonel Miller was killed (see First Regiment). The work was carried on by Maj.-Gen. Samuel J. Gholson, State troops, commissioned April 18, 1863, a work in which he was aided by his staff: Major L. Haughton, Adjutant-General; Maj. Thomas W. Harris, Inspector General; Maj. R. M. Bradford, Quartermaster; Capts. James G. Payne and C. Ferguson, Aides.

At Tupelo, December 15, 1863, General Gholson had Lowry's Regiment (McGuirk's), Ham's Battalion, and the companies of Weatherall, Kilpatrick and Grace, aggregate 1,151.

Many companies were reorganized and re-enlisted early in 1864, when the brigade, known as Gholson's Independent Brigade, was composed of McGuirk's and Lowry's Regiments and Ham's and Harris' Battalions, aggregate 1,968. Ashcraft's Battalion was added, before the transfer to the Confederate States service May 1, 1864, after which the brigade included the regiments of McGuirk, Lowry, Ham and Ashcraft. General Gholson was commissioned as Brigadier-General in the Confederate States service May 6, 1864, and was severely wounded in each of his battles. February, 1865, the brigade was consolidated as Ashcraft's Regiment. Enrollment May 10, 1864, 2,707; effective 1,213.

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1ST (KING’S) REGIMENT MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

Company A -- Copiah County Minute Men (raised in Copiah County, MS)

Company B -- Copiah Guards (raised in Copiah County, MS)

Company C -- Raymond Company (raised in Hinds County, MS)

Company D -- "Company D, Hinds County Militia" (raised in Hinds County, MS)

Company E -- Hinds Minute Men, aka Jackson Company (raised in Hinds County, MS)

Company F -- "Company A, Madison County Minute Men" (raised in Madison County, MS)

Company G -- Capt. Lamar’s Company (raised in Rankin County, MS)

Company H -- Capt. Herring’s Company (raised in Attala County, MS)

Company I -- "First Regiment State Troops of Rankin County" (raised in Rankin County, MS)

Company K -- "Company B, Madison County Minute Men" (raised in Madison County, MS)

Company L -- Davis Guards (raised in Attala County, MS)

This regiment was organized at Grenada July 31, 1862; encamped at Camp Bruce, Warren County, in August, 1862; and at Camp Milldale in September.

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2ND (QUINN’S) REGIMENT MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

Company A -- Capt. Wilson’s Company (raised in Lawrence County, MS)

Company B -- Capt. Cox’s Company (raised in Lawrence County, MS)

Company C -- Amite County Minute Men (raised in Amite County, MS)

Company D -- Covington Farmers (raised in Covington County, MS)

Company E -- Franklin Rangers (raised in Franklin County, MS)

Company F -- Franklin Rebels (raised in Franklin County, MS)

Company G -- Marion Grays (raised in Marion County, MS)

Company H -- Capt. Conerly’s Company (raised in Pike County, MS)

Company I -- Capt. Magee’s Company (raised in Pike County, MS)

 

The regiment was organized 11 August 1862, at Camp Tupper, Hinds County.

The regiment is reported in the returns of January, 1863, as 106 present effective, with Hebert’s Brigade; same in February and March.

The Second Regiment and Second and Fourth Battalions, State Troops, Major H.F. Cook, commanding, were reported as 96 present, 648 absent, Station Milldale; April 15, 1863, Maj. J.D. Fairley, commanding.

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3RD (OWENS’) REGIMENT MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

 

Company A -- Yalobusha Home Defenders (raised in Yalobusha County, MS)

Company B -- Carroll County Defenders (raised in Carroll County, MS)

Company C -- Capt. Walker’s Company, aka "Walker’s Company, Carroll County Militia" (raised in Carroll County, MS)

Company D -- Capt. Barksdale’s Company (raised in Yalobusha County, MS)

Company E -- Capt. Mitchell’s Company (raised in Yalobusha County, MS)

Company F -- Holmes County Minute Men [Tradewell’s] (raised in Holmes County, MS)

Company G -- Holmes County Minute Men [Kyles’] (raised in Holmes County, MS)

Company H -- Choctaw Company No. 2 (raised in Choctaw County, MS)

Company I -- Choctaw Company No. 1 (raised in Choctaw County, MS)

Company K -- Calhoun Minute Men (raised in Calhoun County, MS)

 

This regiment was organized August 7, 1862. February, 1863, the regiment was stationed at Grenada.

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4TH (BROMLEY’S) REGIMENT MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

Company A -- Capt. Humphreys’ Company (raised in Lafayette County, MS)

Company B -- Itawamba Chivalry (raised in Itawamba County, MS)

Company C -- Capt. Carloe’s Company (county of origin not specified)

Company D -- Capt. Gwartney’s [Gwartley’s] Company (county of origin not specified)

Company E -- Capt. Hawkins’ Company (county of origin not specified)

Company F -- Capt. Fountain’s Company (county of origin not specified)

Company G -- Capt. Williams’ Company (county of origin not specified)

Company H -- Itawamba State Guards (raised in Itawamba County, MS)

Company I -- Lafayette Defenders (raised in Lafayette County, MS)

Company K -- Bee Minute Men of Itawamba County (raised in Itawamba County, MS)

Company L -- Capt. Holland’s Company (county of origin not specified)

 

This regiment was organized at Grenada, 25 August 1862. Mentioned in official records as with Hebert’s Brigade, March, 1863.

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5TH (ROBINSON’S) REGIMENT MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

 

Company A -- Newton Minute Men (raised in Newtonn County, MS)

Company B -- Jasper County Minute Men (raised in Jasper County, MS)

Company C -- Capt. Maggard’s Company (raised in Lauderdale County, MS)

Company D -- Clarke Minute Men (raised in Clarke County, MS)

Company E -- Neshoba Minute Men (raised in Neshoba County, MS)

Company F -- Capt. Porter’s Company (raised in Winston County, MS)

Company G -- Capt. Ward’s Company (raised in Smith County, MS)

Company H -- Capt. Fairly’s Company (raised in Jones County, MS)

Company I -- Capt. McLaurin’s Company (raised in Kemper County, MS)

 

The Fifth Reginmnt was organized at Meridian, September 5-6, 1862, and remained there doing heavy guard and fatigue duty until about October 12, when ordered to Columbus, Miss. It was encamped in Lowndes County, doing guard duty and picketing until April 7, 1863, when it was ordered to Vicksburg, where, during the siege of May 18 to July 4, officers and men with few exceptions did their duty faithfully, first in the trenches and afterward on guard, patrol and picket duty along the river, a large part of the regiment being on duty two hours of every six, day and night, during the siege. Some of the best officers of the regiment were killed during the siege and others died of disease. Adjutant Jones was killed when one of the largest shells thrown by Admiral Porter's fleet struck the courthouse where the regiment was quartered, killing and wounding fifteen or twenty men. After this the regiment was moved to the railroad cut, just above the station, where it remained until the surrender. (Notes by Colonel Robinson, 1864.)

Gen. John Adams, commanding fourth district, reported the regiment, aggregate 384, as stationed north of Colurnbus, near the fortifications, in his report of January 1, 1863. The regiment, with the Third Battalion, formed the brigade of Gen. J. V. Harris. In February the regiment was reported 408 present, 568 aggregate, stationed at Columbus, except one company at Meridian.

Until after the battle of Baker's Creek, the State troops on the Vicksburg lines, about 600 in number, including Robinson's Regiment and Burgin's Battalion, under the command of Gen. John V. Harris, were with Moore's Brigade, guarding the river front at Warrenton and the approaches from the lower fords of the Big Black. On May 18 they reported to General Baldwin, whose brigade occupied a line of works to the north of the city, its right near Riddle's house; on the 19th they went into the trenches here, and on the 20th Robinson's Regiment was ordered to the trenches on the river front of the city. Later, the two State commands were attached to Gen. John C. Vaughn's Brigade. Vaughn's report for May 31 shows two of the State troops killed and fifteen wounded in town and one wounded on the land line. After the surrender July 4, the regiment was paroled. At Columbus, September 21, 1863, the regiment and battalion were paid off and mustered out.

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1ST (HARPER’S) BATTALION MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

 

Company A -- Pettus Rebels (raised in Scott County, MS)

Company B -- Capt. Howard’s Company (raised in Leake County, MS)

Company C -- Leake Reserve (raised in Leake County, MS)

Company D -- Scott County Rebels (raised in Scott County, MS)

Company E -- Simpson Minute Men (raised in Simpson County, MS)

Company F -- Capt. Larkin’s Company (raised in Simpson County, MS)

 

Major Harper was commissioned September 5, 1862. The battalion is included in the returns of Gen. John Adams, commanding Fourth District, in January, 1863. April same, headquarters Jackson.

In his report of the battle of Raymond, May 12, 1863, General Bragg said that when he reached Raymond there was no cavalry in his front to observe the enemy but "a small State company, under Captain Hall, who were scouting in the direction of Port Gibson....Early next morning I was informed by couriers from Captain Hall that the enemy was advancing rapidly by the road from Utica. Owing to the smallness of the mounted force -- Captain Hall having but 40 men, and these mostly youths from the neighborhood -- I was unable to ascertain anything concerning the strength of the enemy."

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2ND (COOK’S) BATTALION MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

 

Company A -- Capt. Pattison’s Company (county of origin not specified)

Company B -- Capt. Johnston’s Company (county of origin not specified)

Company C -- Capt. Saunders’ Company (county of origin not specified)

Company D -- Capt. Mason’s Company (county of origin not specified)

Company E -- Capt. Goodrum’s Company (county of origin not specified)

Company F -- Capt. Cameron’s Company (county of origin not specified)

 

This battalion is mentioned in the returns of January, 1863, as 88 effective with Hebert’s Brigade; so also in February and March. With Second Regiment and Fourth Battalion, 96 in all Major H.F. Cook, commanding, at Milldale, April 15, 1863.

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3RD (BURGIN’S) BATTALION MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

 

Company A -- Monroe Minute Men (raised in Monroe County, MS)

Company B -- Capt. Thompson’s Company (raised in Monroe County, MS)

Company C -- Noxubee Minute Men, aka Mississippi Rebels (raised in Noxubee County, MS)

Company D -- Lowndes County Minute Men (raised in Lowndes County, MS)

Company E -- Oktibbeha Minute Men (raised in Oktibbeha County, MS)

Company F -- Capt. Harrington’s Company (raised in Chickasaw County, MS)

Company G -- Capt. Robards’ Company (raised in Hancock County, MS)

Company H -- Capt. Brantley’s Company, aka "Greene and Perry Squad" (raised in Greene & Perry Counties, MS)

 

The battalion was enlisted for an indefinite period, picked men from the militia companies in the various counties, for defense of the State, under orders of the Confederate army officers, and went into camp at Okolona in September, 1862. The field officers were elected September 25. Early in October they were ordered to Columbus. Gen. John Adams, commanding the Fourth District, reported January 5, 1863, Third Battalion, aggregate, 399. "They were sent to Vicksburg by order of General Pemberton November 28, 1862, and are now there in the actual service of the Confederate States. These troops never were mustered into the service of the Confederate States, but have been and still are performing guard and other duties at this post. The State troops are styled by the Governor Minute Men, have arrived at a certain degree of proficiency and will compare favorably with Confederate States troops of the same length of service." Colonel Burgin, who left Columbus in command of the battalion, was stationed at Snyder's Bluff, in command of a brigade. This battalion was the only organization of State troops listed in Gen. M.L. Smith's statement of January, 1863.

Captain Jeptha V, Harris, of the battalion, was promoted as Brigadier-General, commanding Minute Men at Columbus, September 2, 1862. M. P. Jones was his Adjutant. January 19, Gen. Ruggles, commanding at Columbus, ordered Brig.-Gen. Harris, commanding State troops, to remove his brigade, consisting of Fifth Regiment and Third Battalion, to a suitable position about one and one half miles north of this post on the Aberdeen road. Return of Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. V. Harris, for February, 1863, Third Battalion. 246 present, 413 aggregate, stationed at Columbus.

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4TH (POSTLETHWAIT’S) BATTALION MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY MINUTE MEN

Organized 23 October 1862. List of companies unavailable. No other information available.

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1ST (BLYTHE’S) BATTALION MISSISSIPPI CAVALRY MINUTE MEN

(aka 2nd Regiment, Mississippi Partisan Rangers

and aka 1st Regiment, Mississippi Cavalry State Troops)

 

Company A -- DeSoto Partisans, aka DeSoto Rangers (raised in DeSoto County, MS)

Company B -- Bowen’s Rangers (raised in DeSoto County, MS)

Company C -- Ward’s Company (raised in DeSoto County, MS)

Company D -- Renfroe’s Company (raised in DeSoto County, MS)

Company E -- Stillwell’s Company (raised in Marshall County, MS)

Company F -- Hunt Rangers (raised in DeSoto County, MS)

Company G -- Maxwell’s Company (raised in Panola County, MS)

Company H -- Johnson’s Company (raised in Panola County, MS)

Company I -- Williamson’s Company (county of origin not specified)

 

The above are some of the companies. There is no further information in this department. Green L. Blythe, of DeSoto County, was commissioned Major of the First Battalion of Cavalry, State troops (Minute Men), 25 September, 1862. He was commissioned Colonel of the First Regiment Cavalry, State troops, 29 April, 1863. The companies of his command were to a considerable extent organized under the act of Congress authorizing partisan rangers. The command was sometimes referred to as the Second Regiment, Partisan Rangers.

Blythe's Battalion was part of the command collected or attempted to be collected by General Chalmers in the region open to raids from Memphis, early in 1863. A Federal report, February, 1863, says: Van Dorn's movement "clears our front of all cavalry except that of G. L. Blythe's which is operating in the direction of Panola." Three prisoners from this command were reported by Gen. Quinby, commanding expedition across Nonconnah Creek. February 16, Gen. Hurlbut proposed an expedition under Col. A. L. Lee to "sweep around toward Panola and Hernando, enveloping Blythe's force and driving them to the Nonconnah or into the swamp." February 25, Hurlbut reported "Richardson's guerrillas, near Covington, and Blythe's below, still in motion." May 6, General Chalmers reported from Oxford, "half of Blythe's Regiment have never been in camp." May 16, Capt. T. P. Manning ordered to scout in direction of Memphis. May 19, General Chalmers recommended that "the regiment commanded by Col. Green L. Blythe be converted into Confederate troops." May 19, Hurlbut wrote, ordered Gen. W. S. Smith to advance from LaGrange against Chalmers, "Blythe's Battalion is about twelve miles south of Memphis, engaged in conscripting and obtaining horses." Floyd's company mentioned, appears to have been from along the Mississippi River. May 26 Blythe's Regiment in country west of Hernando. May 26, General Chalmers reported: "Colonel Slemons, with Second Arkansas and Second Mississippi Partisans, fired on transports near Austin without effect. Troops of Ellet's mounted marines were disbarked and repulsed, leaving eighteen dead horses. Slemon's casualties, 1 Captain and 2 men killed, 12 wounded and 2 missing."

April 8, driven across Coldwater by Federal expedition, Captain Stillwell’s company engaged. Blythe, with seven small companies, about 300 according to Federal report, skirmished with Bryant's Infantry Brigade, raiding from Memphis, with engagements at Hernando, April 18th, and on the Coldwater, 19th.

A Federal expedition from Memphis to Hernando May 23-24, 1863, reported an encounter with Captain Manning's company near Colonel Blythe's plantation, in which three of the command were killed. Captain Manning's plantation was in the same vicinity. Another raid passed these places May 26.

July 9, General Chalmers feared that few would re-enlist with the possibility of being removed from defense of their homes, but the regiment could be kept in the service as an organization for service as guerrillas (detached companies).

July 21, George reported that very few of Blythe's Regiment could be gotten to Vaiden for re-enlistment, but he could organize a battalion in the regiment, if he had a fair chance.

Blythe's command served under General George in the operations attending the raid of Colonel Mizner, who set out with 1,900 cavalry, June 15-25, from LaGrange, Tenn., with orders from Hurlbut to break the railroad south of Panola, turn on Chalmers, and sweep the country of horses, mules, negroes and the new crop of wheat. George retreated from Senatobia across the Yockeney when he had learned the strength of Mizner's command and reached the railroad bridge too late to protect it. Blythe's Regiment did not accompany McQuick in the pursuit across the Tallahatchie, being exhausted. April 29, 1863, Blythe, Edmondson and Bowen were commissioned as field officers of the First Regiment, State troops. In August the regiment was reported as reorganizing, and not available during the Grenada raid. The regiment was reorganized by General George.

When General Chalmers made his second raid to Colllerville, November 3, 1863, he intended to have Major Blythe burn the water tank at White's Station, near Memphis, but Chalmers was informed that Blythe would not obey his orders. The General wrote: "I have already reported that this command, if allowed to continue its independent action, would greatly demoralize my cavalry."

In 1864-65 Major Blythe was commanding a battalion of State troops, in which were included the following: Companies A & B, of Senatobia [DeSoto County].

 

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